16th Century French Poem – Young Wife & Old Husband & Audio Pronunciation

Author: Camille Chevalier-Karfis

In this 16th century poem written in old French, a young woman is being married to an older man. She shares with us her attempts to seduce her husband, her torments and the decision she finally takes.

1 – 16th Century French Poem “De la Jeune Dame Qui A Vieil Mary” by Clément Marot – Audio Recording

Please press play to hear my readings of the famous French Poem “De la Jeune Dame Qui A Vieil Mary” by Clément Marot.

2 – Classical French Poem “De la Jeune Dame Qui A Vieil Mary” by Clément Marot – Poem in old French

En languissant et en grefve tristesse
Vit las mon cueur, jadis plein de liesse,
Puis que l’on m’a donné mary vieillard.
Hélas, pourquoy ? Rien ne sçait du vieil art
Qu’apprend Vénus, l’amoureuse deesse.

Par un désir de monstrer ma prouesse
Souvent l’assaulx : mais il demande : ” où est-ce ? “,
ou dort peult estre, et mon cueur veille à part
En languissant.

Puis quand je veux lui jouer de finesse,
Honte me dict : ” Cesse, ma fille, cesse,
Garde-t’en bien, à honneur prens esgard. “
Lors je réponds : ” Honte, allez à l’escart :
Je ne veulx pas perdre ainsi ma jeunesse
En languissant. “

3 – Poem in Modern French

En languissant et en griève tristesse
Vit mon las coeur, jadis plein de liesse,
Puisque l’on m’a donné mari vieillard.
Hélas, pourquoi ? Rien ne sait du vieil art
Qu’apprend Vénus, l’amoureuse déesse.

Par un désir de montrer ma prouesse
Souvent l’assaus : mais il demande : ” où est-ce ? “,
ou dort (peut-être), et mon coeur veille à part
En languissant.

Puis quand je veux lui jouer de finesse,
Honte me dit : ” Cesse, ma fille, cesse,
Garde-t’en bien, à honneur prends égard. “
Lors je réponds : ” Honte, allez à l’écart :
Je ne veux pas perdre ainsi ma jeunesse
En languissant. “

Easy French Poetry

Most famous and classic French poems read and analysed in everyday French.

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4 – English Translation of the 16th Century French Poem “De la Jeune Dame Qui A Vieil Mary” by Clément Marot

Here is my own translation of the French poem. I went for a literal translation so you could understand the vocabulary.

In Languishing and grievous sorrow
Lives my weary heart, once full of joy,
Since I was given old husband.
Alas, why? He knows nothing of the old art
Taught by Venus, the love goddess.

By a desire to show my prowess
Often I request from him. But he asks: “Where is it? “
or sleeps (maybe), and my heart is sleepless and lonely
Languishing.

Then when I want to cheat on him,
Shame tells me “Stop, my girl, stop,
Guard thee well, to honor take respect. “
Then I answer, “Shame, go away:
I do not want to lose my youth in
Languishing. “

Author: Camille Chevalier-Karfis

Camille Chevalier-Karfis

Born and raised in Paris, I have been teaching today's French to adults for 23+ years in the US and France. Based on my students' goals and needs, I've created unique downloadable French audiobooks focussing on French like it's spoken today, for all levels. Most of my audiobooks are recorded at several speeds to help you conquer the modern French language. Good luck with your studies and remember, repetition is the key!

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